Trip Reports: Islands Trip Report Photos

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The uneven streets of Old San Juan are narrow and laid with blue cobblestone, which have been polished and cracked from use over the years.

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I could have spent a week in Old San Juan photographing all the beautiful doors around the city. I didn't have that kind of time, but I did stop and make a few images of doors that didn't have cars parked in front of them. 

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As we walked the streets of Old San Juan I was constantly pointing my camera at the  beautiful architecture and colors that make up this historic city.

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Three green doors.

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The streets of Old San Juan, the historical colonial section of San Juan, Puerto Rico are famous for their narrow, blue cobblestone streets and colorful buildings that date back to the 16th and 17th century when San Juan was under Spanish Rule. The oldest parts of the town are still surrounded the fortress walls that have protected this city for hundreds of years. 

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I saw this piece of art on the side of a building in an alley and it caught my eye. 

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A detail shot of one of the many accent pieces that adorn these buildings.

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During world war II the United States Army built an artillery observation point to the fort. Adding a modern concrete feature to the ancient defenses of Castillo San Cristobal, which at the time, was still an active military base. This is a view looking through one of the small slit windows of the observation tower. 

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"La Garita del Diablo" This sentry box is one of the oldest parts of the fort. Legend has it that the devil himself would snatch away soldiers from this lonely outpost at the edge of the sea, which is why it now has the ominous name of "The Devils Garita"

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The forts of Old San Juan are what I really was looking forward to photographing this day. The first one we visited was the Castillo de San Cristobal. Pictured here is one of the iconic "garitas" that have become a symbol for the entire island of Puerto Rico. 

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The inside of the Dungeon. This is not somewhere I would have liked to have been kept. It was hot, humid and downright miserable inside. It was one of my favorite parts of the fort though. I spent probably 20 minutes inside taking photos. By the time I came out I was drenched in sweat. 

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The reason I loved the dungeon so much was because of these fascinating drawing of Spanish Galleons on the dungeon walls. They are most likely the work of a Spanish captain being held here, awaiting execution for mutiny.